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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016, Article ID 2480298, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/2480298
Research Article

Long-Term Oocyte-Like Cell Development in Cultures Derived from Neonatal Marmoset Monkey Ovary

1Stem Cell Biology Unit, German Primate Center-Leibniz Institute for Primate Research, Kellnerweg 4, 37077 Göttingen, Germany
2Microarray and Deep-Sequencing Core Facility, University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG), Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 11, 37077 Göttingen, Germany
3Endocrinology Laboratory, German Primate Center-Leibniz Institute for Primate Research, Kellnerweg 4, 37077 Göttingen, Germany
4Department of Cellular and Molecular Immunology, University of Göttingen, Humboldtallee 34, 37073 Göttingen, Germany

Received 28 May 2015; Revised 28 July 2015; Accepted 28 July 2015

Academic Editor: Irma Virant-Klun

Copyright © 2016 Bentolhoda Fereydouni et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

We use the common marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus) as a preclinical nonhuman primate model to study reproductive and stem cell biology. The neonatal marmoset monkey ovary contains numerous primitive premeiotic germ cells (oogonia) expressing pluripotent stem cell markers including OCT4A (POU5F1). This is a peculiarity compared to neonatal human and rodent ovaries. Here, we aimed at culturing marmoset oogonia from neonatal ovaries. We established a culture system being stable for more than 20 passages and 5 months. Importantly, comparative transcriptome analysis of the cultured cells with neonatal ovary, embryonic stem cells, and fibroblasts revealed a lack of germ cell and pluripotency genes indicating the complete loss of oogonia upon initiation of the culture. From passage 4 onwards, however, the cultured cells produced large spherical, free-floating cells resembling oocyte-like cells (OLCs). OLCs strongly expressed several germ cell genes and may derive from the ovarian surface epithelium. In summary, our novel primate ovarian cell culture initially lacked detectable germ cells but then produced OLCs over a long period of time. This culture system may allow a deeper analysis of early phases of female primate germ cell development and—after significant refinement—possibly also the production of monkey oocytes.