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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016, Article ID 2574152, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/2574152
Research Article

Genome Editing of the CYP1A1 Locus in iPSCs as a Platform to Map AHR Expression throughout Human Development

1Section of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02118, USA
2Center for Regenerative Medicine (CReM), Boston University and Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA 02118, USA
3Department of Environmental Health, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02118, USA

Received 4 January 2016; Accepted 17 March 2016

Academic Editor: Fanny L. Casado

Copyright © 2016 Brenden W. Smith et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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