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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 3187491, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3187491
Review Article

Mesenchymal Stem Cells Subpopulations: Application for Orthopedic Regenerative Medicine

1Departamento de Bioquímica y Medicina Molecular, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León (UANL), Monterrey, NL, Mexico
2Unidad de Terapias Experimentales, Centro de Investigación y Desarrollo en Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León (UANL), Monterrey, NL, Mexico
3Unidad de Neurociencias, Centro de Investigación y Desarrollo en Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León (UANL), Monterrey, NL, Mexico

Received 27 April 2016; Revised 10 July 2016; Accepted 7 August 2016

Academic Editor: Bin Li

Copyright © 2016 Vanessa Pérez-Silos et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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