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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016, Article ID 3924858, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3924858
Review Article

Preconditioning of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Enhance Their Regulation of the Immune Response

1Department of Biomedical Sciences, Nazarbayev University School of Medicine, Astana 010000, Kazakhstan
2Stem Cell Laboratory, National Center for Biotechnology, Astana 010000, Kazakhstan
3Center for Life Sciences, Nazarbayev University, Astana 010000, Kazakhstan
4Division of Cardiology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
5Research Laboratory of Electronics and Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA

Received 5 August 2016; Accepted 28 September 2016

Academic Editor: Marcelo Ezquer

Copyright © 2016 Arman Saparov et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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