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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 4379425, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4379425
Review Article

Stem Cell Models to Investigate the Role of DNA Methylation Machinery in Development of Neuropsychiatric Disorders

Department of Biological Sciences, Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Pilani, Hyderabad Campus, Jawaharnagar, Hyderabad 500 078, India

Received 31 July 2015; Accepted 10 September 2015

Academic Editor: Malin Jonsson

Copyright © 2016 K. Naga Mohan. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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