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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016, Article ID 4829106, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4829106
Review Article

Aggressiveness Niche: Can It Be the Foster Ground for Cancer Metastasis Precursors?

1Cancer Institute, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, USA
2Department of Cancer Biology and Comprehensive Cancer Center, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA

Received 30 March 2016; Accepted 15 June 2016

Academic Editor: Zhaohui Ye

Copyright © 2016 Wael M. ElShamy et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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