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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016, Article ID 4842134, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4842134
Research Article

Wharton’s Jelly-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells and Fibroblast-Derived Extracellular Matrix Synergistically Activate Apoptosis in a p21-Dependent Mechanism in WHCO1 and MDA MB 231 Cancer Cells In Vitro

1International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (ICGEB), Cape Town Component, Wernher and Beit Building (South), UCT Campus, Anzio Road, Observatory, Cape Town 7925, South Africa
2Division of Medical Biochemistry and Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, Anzio Road, Observatory, Cape Town 7925, South Africa
3Perlmutter Cancer Centre, New York University, School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA
4Division of Human Genetics, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, Anzio Road, Observatory, Cape Town 7925, South Africa
5Department of Immunology and Institute for Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pretoria, Gezina, Pretoria 0002, South Africa

Received 21 August 2015; Revised 13 November 2015; Accepted 6 December 2015

Academic Editor: William L. Stanford

Copyright © 2016 Kevin Dzobo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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