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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016, Article ID 5272498, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5272498
Research Article

NFATc4 Regulates Sox9 Gene Expression in Acinar Cell Plasticity and Pancreatic Cancer Initiation

1Department of Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Oncology, University Medical Center Göttingen, Robert-Koch Street 40, 37075 Göttingen, Germany
2Schulze Center for Novel Therapeutics, Division of Oncology Research, Mayo Clinic, 200 1st Street SW No. W4, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
3School of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Key Laboratory of Biotechnology and Pharmaceutical Engineering, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang, China
4Department of Cancer Biology, Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, 4500 San Pablo Road, Jacksonville, FL 32224, USA

Received 15 May 2015; Accepted 12 July 2015

Academic Editor: Silvia Brunelli

Copyright © 2016 Elisabeth Hessmann et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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