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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016, Article ID 5457132, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5457132
Research Article

Label-Free Imaging of Umbilical Cord Tissue Morphology and Explant-Derived Cells

1Biomedical Research Institute, Hasselt University and School of Life Sciences, Transnational University Limburg, Agoralaan Building C, 3590 Diepenbeek, Belgium
2Ziekenhuis Oost-Limburg, Campus St. Jan, Schiepse Bos 6, 3600 Genk, Belgium

Received 14 May 2016; Revised 28 July 2016; Accepted 31 July 2016

Academic Editor: Francesco Petrella

Copyright © 2016 Raf Donders et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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