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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016, Article ID 5797521, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5797521
Review Article

Epigenetic Control of Haematopoietic Stem Cell Aging and Its Clinical Implications

1Department of Haematology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0PT, UK
2National Health Service Blood and Transplant, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Cambridge CB2 0PT, UK
3British Heart Foundation Centre of Excellence, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, UK

Received 17 April 2015; Accepted 1 July 2015

Academic Editor: Lucia Latella

Copyright © 2016 Fizzah Aziz Choudry and Mattia Frontini. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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