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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016, Article ID 6093601, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6093601
Review Article

Epigenetic Reprogramming of Muscle Progenitors: Inspiration for Clinical Therapies

1IRCSS, Fondazione Santa Lucia, Via del Fosso di Fiorano 64, 00143 Roma, Italy
2DAHFMO-Unit of Histology and Medical Embryology, University of Rome “La Sapienza”, Rome, Italy

Received 15 May 2015; Revised 14 September 2015; Accepted 16 September 2015

Academic Editor: James G. Ryall

Copyright © 2016 Silvia Consalvi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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