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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016, Article ID 6493241, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6493241
Research Article

Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Microvesicles Support Ex Vivo Expansion of Cord Blood-Derived CD34+ Cells

1Institute of Hematology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022, China
2Department of Hematology, The Second Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang 050000, China
3Department of Hematology, The Central Hospital of Jingzhou, Jingzhou 434020, China
4Department of Biomedical Engineering, Key Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics of the Ministry of Education, College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, China
5Department of Hematology, The Central Hospital of Wuhan, Wuhan 430012, China

Received 11 December 2015; Accepted 17 January 2016

Academic Editor: Benedetta Bussolati

Copyright © 2016 Hui Xie et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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