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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016, Article ID 7060975, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7060975
Review Article

Stem Cell Therapy for Treatment of Stress Urinary Incontinence: The Current Status and Challenges

1Department of Urology, Affiliated Sixth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China
2Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine, Winston Salem, NC, USA

Received 20 September 2015; Accepted 20 December 2015

Academic Editor: Franca Fagioli

Copyright © 2016 Shukui Zhou et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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