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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 7909176, 21 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7909176
Review Article

A Dishful of a Troubled Mind: Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in Psychiatric Research

1Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary
2National Brain Research Program, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Molecular Psychiatry and In Vitro Disease Modeling Research Group, Budapest, Hungary
3Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Faculty of Medicine, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary

Received 17 July 2015; Accepted 30 September 2015

Academic Editor: Xiaoyang Zhao

Copyright © 2016 Sára Kálmán et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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