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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 8487264, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8487264
Research Article

Characterization and Expression of Senescence Marker in Prolonged Passages of Rat Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

1Stem Cell & Immunity Group, Immunology Laboratory, Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Malaysia
2Regenerative Medicine Research Program, Genetic and Regenerative Medicine Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Malaysia
3Clinical Genetics Unit, Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Malaysia
4Immunology Unit, Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Malaysia

Received 1 February 2016; Revised 23 May 2016; Accepted 23 May 2016

Academic Editor: Franca Fagioli

Copyright © 2016 Noridzzaida Ridzuan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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