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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 9025835, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9025835
Review Article

NK Cell and CD4+FoxP3+ Regulatory T Cell Based Therapies for Hematopoietic Stem Cell Engraftment

1Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
2Hematology and Clinical Immunology, Department of Medicine, University of Perugia, 06132 Perugia, Italy

Received 9 August 2015; Accepted 22 October 2015

Academic Editor: Dominik Wolf

Copyright © 2016 Antonio Pierini et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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