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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016, Article ID 9298535, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9298535
Review Article

Developmental Pathways Direct Pancreatic Cancer Initiation from Its Cellular Origin

1II. Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik, Klinikum rechts der Isar München, Technische Universität München, 81675 Munich, Germany
2Division of Gastroenterology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
3Department of Internal Medicine I, Ulm University, 89081 Ulm, Germany
4Chirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik, Klinikum rechts der Isar München, Technische Universität München, 81675 Munich, Germany

Received 24 April 2015; Accepted 25 June 2015

Academic Editor: Kodandaramireddy Nalapareddy

Copyright © 2016 Maximilian Reichert et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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