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Stem Cells International
Volume 2017, Article ID 1719050, 13 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1719050
Review Article

Astrocytes at the Hub of the Stress Response: Potential Modulation of Neurogenesis by miRNAs in Astrocyte-Derived Exosomes

1Centro de Investigaciones Biomédicas, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de los Andes, Santiago, Chile
2Biomedical Neuroscience Institute, Universidad de Chile, Santiago, Chile
3Cells for Cells, Santiago, Chile

Correspondence should be addressed to Roberto Henzi; moc.liamg@iznehjpr

Received 1 July 2017; Accepted 16 August 2017; Published 7 September 2017

Academic Editor: Mark W. Hamrick

Copyright © 2017 Alejandro Luarte et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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