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Stem Cells International
Volume 2017, Article ID 1732094, 16 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1732094
Research Article

Allogeneic Umbilical Cord-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells as a Potential Source for Cartilage and Bone Regeneration: An In Vitro Study

1Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, University of Turin, Torino, Italy
2University of Turin Molecular Biotechnology Center, Torino, Italy
3Department of Biomedicine, University Hospital of Basel, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland
4IRCCS Istituto Ortopedico Galeazzi, Milano, Italy
5Department of Biomedical Sciences for Health, University of Milan, Milano, Italy

Correspondence should be addressed to A. Marmotti; ti.dniwni@ittomram.oinotna

Received 24 July 2017; Revised 2 October 2017; Accepted 11 October 2017; Published 16 November 2017

Academic Editor: Michael Uhlin

Copyright © 2017 A. Marmotti et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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