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Stem Cells International
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 2014132, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/2014132
Research Article

Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Restoration of Fertility at Experimental Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

Department of Cryopathophysiology and Immunology, Institute for Problems of Cryobiology and Сryomedicine of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Pereyaslavskaya Str. 23, Kharkov 61015, Ukraine

Correspondence should be addressed to Mariia Yukhta; au.atem@yramavoppilif

Received 16 February 2017; Revised 15 June 2017; Accepted 17 July 2017; Published 27 August 2017

Academic Editor: Eva Mezey

Copyright © 2017 Nataliia Volkova et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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