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Stem Cells International
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 2353240, 16 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/2353240
Research Article

Crosstalk with Inflammatory Macrophages Shapes the Regulatory Properties of Multipotent Adult Progenitor Cells

1Biomedical Research Institute/Transnational University Limburg, School of Life Sciences, Hasselt University, 3590 Diepenbeek, Belgium
2Department of Regenerative Medicine, Athersys Inc., Cleveland, OH, USA
3ReGenesys BVBA, Leuven, Belgium

Correspondence should be addressed to Niels Hellings

Received 9 March 2017; Revised 27 May 2017; Accepted 12 June 2017; Published 12 July 2017

Academic Editor: Vladislav Volarevic

Copyright © 2017 Stylianos Ravanidis et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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