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Stem Cells International
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 2389753, 15 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/2389753
Research Article

Allogeneic Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Ameliorate Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis by Regulating Self-Reactive T Cell Responses and Dendritic Cell Function

1Institute of Parasitology and Biomedicine “López-Neyra”, CSIC, PTS, Granada, Spain
2GENYO, Centre of Genomics and Oncological Research, Pfizer/University of Granada/Andalusian Regional Government, PTS, Granada, Spain
3School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, IBIMER, CIBM, University of Granada, Granada, Spain

Correspondence should be addressed to Per Anderson and Mario Delgado

Received 17 October 2016; Accepted 18 December 2016; Published 30 January 2017

Academic Editor: Marcella Franquesa

Copyright © 2017 Per Anderson et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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