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Stem Cells International
Volume 2017, Article ID 2905104, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/2905104
Research Article

Therapeutic Benefit for Late, but Not Early, Passage Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Pain Behaviour in an Animal Model of Osteoarthritis

1Arthritis Research UK Pain Centre and School of Life Sciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK
2Institute for Science and Technology in Medicine, Guy Hilton Research Centre, Keele University, Staffordshire, UK
3Institute for Science and Technology in Medicine, Keele University at RJAH Orthopaedic Hospital, Oswestry, UK
4School of Science and Technology, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, UK

Correspondence should be addressed to Alicia J. El Haj; ku.ca.eleek@jah.le.j.a

Received 26 May 2017; Accepted 7 September 2017; Published 24 December 2017

Academic Editor: Víctor Carriel

Copyright © 2017 Victoria Chapman et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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