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Stem Cells International
Volume 2017, Article ID 3267352, 14 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3267352
Review Article

A Look into Stem Cell Therapy: Exploring the Options for Treatment of Ischemic Stroke

1Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Loma Linda University School of Medicine, 11041 Campus Street, Risley Hall, Room 219, Loma Linda, CA 92354, USA
2Loma Linda University School of Medicine, Loma Linda, CA 92354, USA
3Department of Neurosurgery, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China
4Department of Neurosurgery, Loma Linda University School of Medicine, Loma Linda, CA 92354, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to John H. Zhang; moc.oohay@0193gnahznhoj

Received 19 May 2017; Revised 21 August 2017; Accepted 12 September 2017; Published 22 October 2017

Academic Editor: Heinrich Sauer

Copyright © 2017 Cesar Reis et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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