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Stem Cells International
Volume 2017, Article ID 3296498, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3296498
Research Article

Enhancement of Anti-Inflammatory and Osteogenic Abilities of Mesenchymal Stem Cells via Cell-to-Cell Adhesion to Periodontal Ligament-Derived Fibroblasts

1Division of Cellular Biosignal Sciences, Department of Biochemistry, Iwate Medical University, Yahaba, Iwate 028-3694, Japan
2Division of Periodontology, Department of Conservative Dentistry, Iwate Medical University School of Dentistry, Morioka, Iwate 020-8505, Japan
3Department of Otolaryngology, Dentistry and Oral Surgery, Kansai Medical University, Hirakata, Osaka 573-1010, Japan

Correspondence should be addressed to Naoyuki Chosa; pj.ca.dem-etawi@asohcn

Received 11 October 2016; Revised 14 December 2016; Accepted 22 December 2016; Published 12 January 2017

Academic Editor: Eva Mezey

Copyright © 2017 Keita Suzuki et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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