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Stem Cells International
Volume 2017, Article ID 3615729, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3615729
Research Article

Human Menstrual Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells as Potential Cell Carriers for Oncolytic Adenovirus

1Virotherapy and Gene Therapy Group, ProCure Program, Translational Research Laboratory, Instituto Catalan de Oncología-IDIBELL, Barcelona, Spain
2Servei d'Anatomia Patològica, Hospital Universitari Arnau de Vilanova i Institut de Recerca Biomèdica de Lleida, Lleida, Spain
3Genomics and Cytomics Unit, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain
4Cellular Biotechnology Laboratory, Institute of Health Carlos III (ISCIII), Majadahonda, Madrid, Spain

Correspondence should be addressed to R. Moreno; ten.aigolocnoci@oneromafar

Received 16 February 2017; Revised 19 April 2017; Accepted 4 May 2017; Published 11 July 2017

Academic Editor: Gerald A. Colvin

Copyright © 2017 R. Moreno et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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