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Stem Cells International
Volume 2017, Article ID 4015039, 17 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4015039
Review Article

The Immunomodulatory Effects of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Polarization within the Tumor Microenvironment Niche

Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Marxa L. Figueiredo; ude.eudrup@ieugiflm

Received 22 April 2017; Revised 11 July 2017; Accepted 16 July 2017; Published 17 October 2017

Academic Editor: Josef Buttigieg

Copyright © 2017 Cosette M. Rivera-Cruz et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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