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Stem Cells International
Volume 2017, Article ID 5046953, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5046953
Review Article

Structure and Functions of Blood Vessels and Vascular Niches in Bone

1Institute of Clinical Sciences, Imperial College London, London W12 0NN, UK
2MRC London Institute of Medical Sciences, Imperial College London, London W12 0NN, UK

Correspondence should be addressed to Saravana K. Ramasamy; ku.ca.lairepmi@ymasamar.s

Received 5 May 2017; Revised 26 July 2017; Accepted 23 August 2017; Published 17 September 2017

Academic Editor: Hong Qian

Copyright © 2017 Saravana K. Ramasamy. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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