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Stem Cells International
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 5619472, 17 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5619472
Review Article

Stemness in Cancer: Stem Cells, Cancer Stem Cells, and Their Microenvironment

1Colegio de Ciencias Biológicas y Ambientales, Universidad San Francisco de Quito (USFQ), 170901 Quito, Ecuador
2Colegio de Ciencias de la Salud, Escuela de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad San Francisco de Quito (USFQ), 170901 Quito, Ecuador
3Mito-Act Research Consortium, Quito, Ecuador
4Colegio de Ciencias de la Salud, Escuela de Medicina, Universidad San Francisco de Quito (USFQ), 170901 Quito, Ecuador
5Colegio de Ciencias Biológicas y Ambientales, Instituto de Microbiología, Universidad San Francisco de Quito (USFQ), 170901 Quito, Ecuador

Correspondence should be addressed to Andrés Caicedo; ce.ude.qfsu@odeciaca

Received 9 December 2016; Revised 31 January 2017; Accepted 19 February 2017; Published 4 April 2017

Academic Editor: Xiaojiang Cui

Copyright © 2017 Pedro M. Aponte and Andrés Caicedo. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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