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Stem Cells International
Volume 2017, Article ID 6392592, 13 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/6392592
Review Article

Traumatic Brain Injury and Stem Cell: Pathophysiology and Update on Recent Treatment Modalities

1Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Loma Linda University School of Medicine, 11041 Campus Street, Risley Hall, Room 219, Loma Linda, CA 92354, USA
2Loma Linda University School of Medicine, Loma Linda, CA 92354, USA
3Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, Loma Linda School of Public Health, Loma Linda, CA 92350, USA
4Department of Neurosurgery, Second Affiliated Hospital School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China
5Department of Neurosurgery, Loma Linda University School of Medicine, Loma Linda, CA 92354, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to John H. Zhang; moc.oohay@0193gnahznhoj

Received 19 May 2017; Accepted 26 July 2017; Published 9 August 2017

Academic Editor: Gerald A. Colvin

Copyright © 2017 Cesar Reis et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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