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Stem Cells International
Volume 2017, Article ID 6597815, 13 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/6597815
Review Article

Xeno-Free Strategies for Safe Human Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cell Expansion: Supplements and Coatings

1I3S, Instituto de Investigação e Inovação em Saúde, Universidade do Porto (UP), Porto, Portugal
2Instituto de Engenharia Biomédica (INEB), Universidade do Porto (UP), Porto, Portugal
3Faculdade de Engenharia, Universidade do Porto (UP), Porto, Portugal
4Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas Abel Salazar (ICBAS), Universidade do Porto (UP), Porto, Portugal

Correspondence should be addressed to M. Cimino; tp.pu.beni@onimic.aruam and M. C. L. Martins; tp.pu.beni@snitramc

Received 20 April 2017; Accepted 1 August 2017; Published 11 October 2017

Academic Editor: Miguel Alaminos

Copyright © 2017 M. Cimino et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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