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Stem Cells International
Volume 2017, Article ID 6909163, 14 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/6909163
Research Article

Effects of Macromolecular Crowding on Human Adipose Stem Cell Culture in Fetal Bovine Serum, Human Serum, and Defined Xeno-Free/Serum-Free Conditions

1Adult Stem Cell Group, BioMediTech, Faculty of Medicine and Life Sciences, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland
2Science Center, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland
3NUS Tissue Engineering Program, Life Sciences Institute, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117510
4Department of Biomedical Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117575
5Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Diseases, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland
6Department of Biochemistry, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117575
7Institute of Chemistry and Biology, Zurich University of Applied Sciences (ZHAW), 8820 Wädenswil, Switzerland

Correspondence should be addressed to Mimmi Patrikoski; if.atu.ffats@iksokirtap.immim

Received 26 August 2016; Revised 27 January 2017; Accepted 16 February 2017; Published 30 March 2017

Academic Editor: Peter J. Quesenberry

Copyright © 2017 Mimmi Patrikoski et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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