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Stem Cells International
Volume 2017, Article ID 7068567, 7 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7068567
Review Article

Mitochondrial Heterogeneity: Evaluating Mitochondrial Subpopulation Dynamics in Stem Cells

Laboratory of Aging and Infertility Research, Department of Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to D. C. Woods; ude.uen@sdoow.d

Received 13 February 2017; Accepted 3 May 2017; Published 5 July 2017

Academic Editor: Riikka Hämäläinen

Copyright © 2017 D. C. Woods. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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