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Scientifica
Volume 2012, Article ID 438204, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.6064/2012/438204
Review Article

The Epstein-Barr Virus EBNA1 Protein

Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto, 1 Kings College Circle, Toronto, ON, Canada M5S 1A8

Received 21 October 2012; Accepted 28 November 2012

Academic Editors: M. Lopez-Lastra and L. Verkoczy

Copyright © 2012 Lori Frappier. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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