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Scientifica
Volume 2012, Article ID 509073, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.6064/2012/509073
Review Article

Finding the Correct Partner: The Meiotic Courtship

Departamento de Genética, Facultad de Biología, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid, Spain

Received 15 June 2012; Accepted 15 July 2012

Academic Editors: J. L. Badano and B. Barre

Copyright © 2012 Tomás Naranjo. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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