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Scientifica
Volume 2012, Article ID 543176, 22 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.6064/2012/543176
Review Article

Marsupial Genome Sequences: Providing Insight into Evolution and Disease

Division of Evolution, Ecology and Genetics, Research School of Biology, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia

Received 5 September 2012; Accepted 26 September 2012

Academic Editors: D. E. K. Ferrier, C. Kumar-Sinha, and H. Schatten

Copyright © 2012 Janine E. Deakin. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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