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Scientifica
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 548150, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.6064/2012/548150
Review Article

Regulation of Inflammatory Pathways in Cancer and Infectious Disease of the Cervix

MRC/UCT Research Group for Receptor Biology, Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine and Division of Medical Biochemistry, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, Observatory, Cape Town, 7925, South Africa

Received 12 April 2012; Accepted 21 May 2012

Academic Editors: H. Akari, R. I. Aqeilan, R. A. Blaheta, and Y. Oji

Copyright © 2012 Anthonio Adefuye and Kurt Sales. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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