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Scientifica
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 560514, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.6064/2012/560514
Research Article

The Association between COMT, BDNF, and NRG1 and Premorbid Social Functioning in Patients with Psychosis, Their Relatives, and Controls

1NIHR Biomedical Research Centre for Mental Health, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and Institute of Psychiatry, Kings College London, P.O. Box 63, De Crespigny Park, London SE5 8AF, UK
2Department of Psychiatry, Clinical Science Institute, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland

Received 22 April 2012; Accepted 15 May 2012

Academic Editors: A. Evers, M. A. Niznikiewicz, and C. Toni

Copyright © 2012 Muriel Walshe et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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