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Scientifica
Volume 2014, Article ID 703136, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/703136
Research Article

Inducible Protective Processes in Animal Systems XIII: Comparative Analysis of Induction of Adaptive Response by EMS and MMS in Ehrlich Ascites Carcinoma Cells

Department of Studies in Bioscience, Post-Graduate Centre, University of Mysore, Hemagangotri, Hassan, Karnataka 573220, India

Received 25 January 2014; Revised 9 May 2014; Accepted 12 May 2014; Published 4 June 2014

Academic Editor: Nicolaas A. Franken

Copyright © 2014 Periyapatna Vishwaprakash Mahadimane and Venkateshaiah Vasudev. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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