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Scientifica
Volume 2014, Article ID 768607, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/768607
Review Article

The Cardioprotective Actions of Hydrogen Sulfide in Acute Myocardial Infarction and Heart Failure

1Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics and Cardiovascular Center of Excellence, LSU Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA
2Department of Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
3Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA

Received 27 February 2014; Revised 30 April 2014; Accepted 16 May 2014; Published 22 June 2014

Academic Editor: Gisele Zapata-Sudo

Copyright © 2014 David J. Polhemus et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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