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Scientifica
Volume 2018 (2018), Article ID 1451894, 19 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/1451894
Review Article

African Orphan Crops under Abiotic Stresses: Challenges and Opportunities

1Institute of Plant Sciences, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland
2Center for Development and Environment (CDE), University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland
3Institute of Biotechnology, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Correspondence should be addressed to Zerihun Tadele; hc.ebinu.spi@eledat.nuhirez

Received 20 October 2017; Accepted 17 December 2017; Published 17 January 2018

Academic Editor: Prateek Tripathi

Copyright © 2018 Zerihun Tadele. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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