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Sleep Disorders
Volume 2012, Article ID 789274, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/789274
Research Article

Morning Cortisol Levels and Perceived Stress in Irregular Shift Workers Compared with Regular Daytime Workers

1Centre of Excellence of Health and Work Ability, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, 00250 Helsinki, Finland
2Institute of Dentistry, University of Helsinki, 00014 Helsinki, Finland
3Department of Cardiology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, 00029 Helsinki, Finland
4Centre of Excellence of Human Factors at Work, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, 00250 Helsinki, Finland
5Helsinki Sleep Clinic, Vitalmed Research Centre, 00420 Helsinki, Finland
6Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, 00014 Helsinki Helsinki, Finland
7Finnish Broadcasting Company and Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, 00014 Helsinki, Finland

Received 8 December 2011; Revised 15 March 2012; Accepted 29 March 2012

Academic Editor: M. J. Thorpy

Copyright © 2012 Harri Lindholm et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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