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Sleep Disorders
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 160374, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/160374
Review Article

Sleep and Military Members: Emerging Issues and Nonpharmacological Intervention

Department of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Alberta, 2-64 Corbett Hall, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6G 2G4

Received 24 April 2013; Revised 24 June 2013; Accepted 26 June 2013

Academic Editor: Marco Zucconi

Copyright © 2013 Cary A. Brown et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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