Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Sleep Disorders
Volume 2013, Article ID 735812, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/735812
Research Article

Trait Hostility, Perceived Stress, and Sleep Quality in a Sample of Normal Sleepers

1Psychology Department, Suffolk University, 41 Temple Street, Boston, MA 02114, USA
2Independent Practice, 25 West 86th Street No. 3, New York, NY 10024, USA

Received 19 December 2012; Revised 6 March 2013; Accepted 6 March 2013

Academic Editor: Giora Pillar

Copyright © 2013 Nicholas D. Taylor et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. S. Rubman, J. Brantley, W. Waters, G. Jones, J. Constans, and C. Findley, “Daily stress and insomnia,” in Proceedings of the Meeting of the Society of Behavioral Medicine, Chicago, Ill, USA, 1990.
  2. A. Sadeh, G. Keinan, and K. Daon, “Effects of stress on sleep: the moderating role of coping style,” Health Psychology, vol. 23, no. 5, pp. 542–545, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. E. C. Suarez and R. B. Williams, “Situational determinants of cardiovascular and emotional reactivity in high and low hostile men,” Psychosomatic Medicine, vol. 51, no. 4, pp. 404–418, 1989. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. T. Q. Miller, T. W. Smith, C. W. Turner, M. L. Guijarro, and A. J. Hallet, “A meta-analytic review of research on hostility and physical health,” Psychological Bulletin, vol. 119, no. 2, pp. 322–348, 1996. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. A. D. Krystal and J. D. Edinger, “Measuring sleep quality,” Sleep Medicine, vol. 9, no. 1, pp. S10–S17, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. C. M. Morin, S. Rodrigue, and H. Ivers, “Role of stress, arousal, and coping skills in primary insomnia,” Psychosomatic Medicine, vol. 65, no. 2, pp. 259–267, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. A. Harvey, “A cognitive model of insomnia,” Behaviour Research and Therapy, vol. 40, no. 8, pp. 869–893, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  8. A. J. Guastella and M. L. Moulds, “The impact of rumination on sleep quality following a stressful life event,” Personality and Individual Differences, vol. 42, no. 6, pp. 1151–1162, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. J. C. Barefoot, K. A. Dodge, B. L. Peterson, W. G. Dahlstrom, and R. B. Williams, “The Cook-Medley hostility scale: item content and ability to predict survival,” Psychosomatic Medicine, vol. 51, no. 1, pp. 46–57, 1989. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. L. D. Jamner, D. Shapiro, I. B. Goldstein, and R. Hug, “Ambulatory blood pressure and heart rate in paramedics: effects of cynical hostility and defensiveness,” Psychosomatic Medicine, vol. 53, no. 4, pp. 393–406, 1991. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. E. Brondolo, K. I. Grantham, W. Karlin et al., “Trait hostility and ambulatory blood pressure among traffic enforcement agents: the effects of stressful social interactions,” Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, vol. 14, no. 2, pp. 110–121, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. N. Granö, J. Vahtera, M. Virtanen, L. Keltikangas-Järvinen, and M. Kivimäki, “Association of hostility with sleep duration and sleep disturbances in an employee population,” International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, vol. 15, no. 2, pp. 73–80, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. J. L. Ireland and V. Culpin, “The relationship between sleeping problems and aggression, anger, and impulsivity in a population of juvenile and young offenders,” Journal of Adolescent Health, vol. 38, no. 6, pp. 649–655, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. I. Brissette and S. Cohen, “The contribution of individual differences in hostility to the associations between daily interpersonal conflict, affect, and sleep,” Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, vol. 28, no. 9, pp. 1265–1274, 2002. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. H. Ursin and H. R. Eriksen, “The cognitive activation theory of stress,” Psychoneuroendocrinology, vol. 29, no. 5, pp. 567–592, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. V. J. Fortunato and J. Harsh, “Stress and sleep quality: the moderating role of negative affectivity,” Personality and Individual Differences, vol. 41, no. 5, pp. 825–836, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. S. Brand, M. Gerber, U. Pühse, and E. Holsboer-Trachsler, “Depression, hypomania, and dysfunctional sleep-related cognitions as mediators between stress and insomnia: the best advice is not always found on the pillow,” International Journal of Stress Management, vol. 17, no. 2, pp. 114–134, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. A. N. Vgontzas, E. O. Bixler, H. M. Lin et al., “Chronic insomnia is associated with nyctohemeral activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis: clinical implications,” Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, vol. 86, no. 8, pp. 3787–3794, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. M. H. Burleson, K. M. Poehlmann, L. C. Hawkley et al., “Neuroendocrine and cardiovascular reactivity to stress in mid-aged and older women: long-term temporal consistency of individual differences,” Psychophysiology, vol. 40, no. 3, pp. 358–369, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. J. F. Brosschot, S. Pieper, and J. F. Thayer, “Expanding stress theory: prolonged activation and perseverative cognition,” Psychoneuroendocrinology, vol. 30, no. 10, pp. 1043–1049, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. J. F. Brosschot and J. F. Thayer, “Anger inhibition, cardiovascular recovery, and vagal function: a model of the link between hostility and cardiovascular disease,” Annals of Behavioral Medicine, vol. 20, no. 4, pp. 326–332, 1998. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. M. F. Scheier and M. W. Bridges, “Person variables and health: personality predispositions and acute psychological states as shared determinants for disease,” Psychosomatic Medicine, vol. 57, no. 3, pp. 255–268, 1995. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. R. Williams, J. Barefoot, and R. Shekell, “The health consequences of hostility,” in Anger and Hostility in Cardiovascular Disease and Behavioral Disorders, M. Chesney and R. Rosenman, Eds., pp. 173–185, Hemisphere, Columbia, SC, USA, 1985. View at Google Scholar
  24. S. A. Neumann, S. R. Waldstein, J. J. Sollers, J. F. Thayer, and J. D. Sorkin, “Hostility and distraction have differential influences on cardiovascular recovery from anger recall in women,” Health Psychology, vol. 23, no. 6, pp. 631–640, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. H. A. Demaree and D. E. Everhart, “Healthy high-hostiles: reduced parasympathetic activity and decreased sympathovagal flexibility during negative emotional processing,” Personality and Individual Differences, vol. 36, no. 2, pp. 457–469, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. B. L. Fredrickson, K. E. Maynard, M. J. Helms, T. L. Haney, I. C. Siegler, and J. C. Barefoot, “Hostility predicts magnitude and duration of blood pressure response to anger,” Journal of Behavioral Medicine, vol. 23, no. 3, pp. 229–243, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. R. D. Chervin, J. E. Dillon, K. H. Archbold, and D. L. Ruzicka, “Conduct problems and symptoms of sleep disorders in children,” Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, vol. 42, no. 2, pp. 201–208, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. P. L. Haynes, R. R. Bootzin, L. Smith, J. Cousins, M. Cameron, and S. Stevens, “Sleep and aggression in substance-abusing adolescents: results from an integrative behavioral sleep-treatment pilot program,” Sleep, vol. 29, no. 4, pp. 512–520, 2006. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. W. W. Cook and D. M. Medley, “Proposed hostility and Pharisaic-virtue scales for the MMPI,” Journal of Applied Psychology, vol. 38, no. 6, pp. 414–418, 1954. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  30. D. J. Buysse, C. F. Reynolds, T. H. Monk, S. R. Berman, and D. J. Kupfer, “The Pittsburgh sleep quality index: a new instrument for psychiatric practice and research,” Psychiatry Research, vol. 28, no. 2, pp. 193–213, 1989. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  31. S. Cohen, T. Kamarck, and R. Mermelstein, “A global measure of perceived stress,” Journal of Health and Social Behavior, vol. 24, no. 4, pp. 385–396, 1983. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  32. S. Cohen, “Contrasting the Hassles scale and the perceived stress scale. Who's really measuring appraised stress?” American Psychologist, vol. 41, no. 6, pp. 716–718, 1986. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  33. K. Han, N. Weed, R. Calhoun, and J. Butcher, “Psychometric characteristics of the MMPI-2 cook-medley hostility scale,” Journal of Personality Assessment, vol. 65, no. 3, pp. 567–585, 1995. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  34. R. Levin and G. Fireman, “Nightmare prevalence, nightmare distress, and self-reported psychological disturbance,” Sleep, vol. 25, no. 2, pp. 205–212, 2002. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  35. P. J. Brantley, C. D. Waggoner, G. N. Jones, and N. B. Rappaport, “A daily stress inventory: development, reliability, and validity,” Journal of Behavioral Medicine, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 61–74, 1987. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  36. A. Kazdin, Research Design in Clinical Psychology, Allyn & Bacon, Boston, Mass, USA, 4th edition, 2002.
  37. R. M. Baron and D. A. Kenny, “The moderator-mediator variable distinction in social psychological research. Conceptual, strategic, and statistical considerations,” Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, vol. 51, no. 6, pp. 1173–1182, 1986. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  38. R. G. Wilkinson, “Socioeconomic determinants of health: health inequalities: relative or absolute material standards?” British Medical Journal, vol. 314, no. 7080, pp. 591–595, 1997. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  39. R. T. Gross and T. D. Borkovec, “Effects of cognitive intrusion manipulation on the sleep-onset latency of good sleepers,” Behavior Therapy, vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 112–116, 1982. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  40. E. S. Healey, A. Kales, and L. J. Monroe, “Onset of insomnia: role of life-stress events,” Psychosomatic Medicine, vol. 43, no. 5, pp. 439–451, 1981. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  41. N. J. Ali, D. Pitson, and J. R. Stradling, “Sleep disordered breathing: effects of adenotonsillectomy on behaviour and psychological functioning,” European Journal of Pediatrics, vol. 155, no. 1, pp. 56–62, 1996. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  42. B. D. Booth, J. Paul Fedoroff, S. D. Curry, and A. B. Douglass, “Sleep apnea as a possible factor contributing to aggression in sex offenders,” Journal of Forensic Sciences, vol. 51, no. 5, pp. 1178–1181, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus