Table of Contents
Sequencing
Volume 2013, Article ID 756983, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/756983
Research Article

Molecular Cloning, Modeling, and Characterization of Type 2 Metallothionein from Plantago ovata Forsk

1Department of Biophysics, Molecular Biology and Bioinformatics, University of Calcutta, 92, APC Road, Kolkata 700009, India
2Structural Genomics Section, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700 064, India

Received 28 September 2012; Revised 31 January 2013; Accepted 11 February 2013

Academic Editor: Alfredo Ciccodicola

Copyright © 2013 Amitava Moulick et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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