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Stroke Research and Treatment
Volume 2016, Article ID 5391598, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5391598
Clinical Study

Conductive Education as a Method of Stroke Rehabilitation: A Single Blinded Randomised Controlled Feasibility Study

1Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL, UK
2National Institute of Conductive Education, Birmingham B13 3RD, UK
3School of Social Sciences, Birmingham City University, Birmingham B4 7BD, UK
4Faculty of Life Sciences and Medicine, King’s College London, London SE1 1UL, UK

Received 14 January 2016; Accepted 29 May 2016

Academic Editor: Wai-Kwong Tang

Copyright © 2016 Judith Bek et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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