Stroke Research and Treatment

New Technologies for Stroke Rehabilitation


Publishing date
07 Dec 2012
Status
Published
Submission deadline
20 Jul 2012

1Operative Unit F, Fondazione Santa Lucia, I.R.C.C.S., Rome, Italy

2Medical Park Berlin Humboldtmühle AG, Berlin, Germany

3Functional Exploration and Neuromodulation of Nervous System Investigation Group, Hospital Nacional de Paraplejicos, Toledo, Spain

4Clinical Laboratory of Experimental Neurorehabilitation, Fondazione Santa Lucia I.R.C.C.S., Rome, Italy


New Technologies for Stroke Rehabilitation

Description

Stroke is the leading cause of disability in all industrialized countries. Common rehabilitation usually allows about 50% of patients with stroke to recover walking, leaving the others not independent in walking and other activities of daily living.

For these reasons, an increasing number of researches are pursuing the use of new technologies to improve the efficacy of rehabilitation. For example, over the last decade, many devices for robotic- assisted gait training or for central and peripheral electrical stimulation have been developed to allow patients to perform early, intensive, and task-oriented exercises. Some studies showed the efficacy of these new technological approaches, whereas some others did not show any improvement in respect of conventional therapies. This uncertainty about efficacy, together with high purchase cost for some of these new technologies, some difficulties in use, and a somewhat diffuse scepticism by some members of the rehabilitation teams may limit the transfer of these new technologies from research laboratories to clinical settings.

We invite investigators to contribute original research articles as well as review articles that will stimulate the continuing efforts for clarifying the efficacy of new technological approaches for rehabilitation of people with stroke. Furthermore, we invite researches to submit manuscripts about the relearning mechanisms potentially improved by the use of these technologies. We are also interested in articles describing the modalities in which these technologies can put into action all their potential, together with the description of the characteristics of patients more responsive to these kinds of treatments. On the other hand, we would also stimulate the submission of articles in which the efficacy of conventional therapies resulted equal or even higher than that of these new technologies, in order to contribute to the debate about their efficacy. Potential topics, related to stroke rehabilitation, include, but are not limited to:

  • Robotic and/or electromechanical devices for gait recovery
  • Robotic and/or electromechanical devices for improving upper limb functional recovery
  • Electrical stimulations (transcranial direct current stimulation, transcranial magnetic stimulation, functional electrical stimulation, etc.)
  • Neuroprosthesis
  • Brain neural computer interface
  • Biofeedback
  • Instrumented movement analysis
  • Virtual reality for stroke rehabilitation

Before submission authors should carefully read over the journal's Author Guidelines, which are located at http://www.hindawi.com/journals/srt/guidelines/. Prospective authors should submit an electronic copy of their complete manuscript through the journal Manuscript Tracking System at http://mts.hindawi.com/ according to the following timetable:


Articles

  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2013
  • - Article ID 815814
  • - Editorial

New Technologies for Stroke Rehabilitation

Marco Iosa | Stefan Hesse | ... | Stefano Paolucci
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2013
  • - Article ID 837595
  • - Clinical Study

The ABC of tDCS: Effects of Anodal, Bilateral and Cathodal Montages of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation in Patients with Stroke—A Pilot Study

A. Fusco | D. De Angelis | ... | V. Venturiero
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 820931
  • - Clinical Study

Hand Robotics Rehabilitation: Feasibility and Preliminary Results of a Robotic Treatment in Patients with Hemiparesis

Patrizio Sale | Valentina Lombardi | Marco Franceschini
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 523564
  • - Clinical Study

Walking Training with Foot Drop Stimulator Controlled by a Tilt Sensor to Improve Walking Outcomes: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study in Patients with Stroke in Subacute Phase

G. Morone | A. Fusco | ... | L. Pratesi
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 176806
  • - Clinical Study

A Pilot Evaluation of On-Road Detection Performance by Drivers with Hemianopia Using Oblique Peripheral Prisms

Alex R. Bowers | Mark Tant | Eli Peli
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 187965
  • - Review Article

Seven Capital Devices for the Future of Stroke Rehabilitation

M. Iosa | G. Morone | ... | S. Paolucci
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 972069
  • - Review Article

A Systematic Review of Bilateral Upper Limb Training Devices for Poststroke Rehabilitation

A. (Lex) E. Q. van Delden | C. (Lieke) E. Peper | ... | Peter J. Beek
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 247165
  • - Clinical Study

SenseWear Armband and Stroke: Validity of Energy Expenditure and Step Count Measurement during Walking

Patricia J. Manns | Robert G. Haennel
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 348631
  • - Research Article

Rehabilitation of the Upper Extremity after Stroke: A Case Series Evaluating REO Therapy and an Auditory Sensor Feedback for Trunk Control

G. Thielman | P. Bonsall
Stroke Research and Treatment
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate21%
Submission to final decision60 days
Acceptance to publication35 days
CiteScore2.430
Impact Factor-
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