Table of Contents
Scholarly Research Exchange
Volume 2009, Article ID 475963, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.3814/2009/475963
Review Article

Preclinical Assays for Identifying Cancer Chemopreventive Phytochemicals

1Department of Oncologic Pathology, Kanazawa Medical University, 1-1 Daigaku, Uchinada, Ishikawa 920-0293, Japan
2Tokai Cytopathology Institute, Cancer Research and Prevention (TCI-CaRP), 4-33 Minami-Uzura, Gifu City, Gifu 500-8285, Japan

Received 9 December 2008; Revised 14 March 2009; Accepted 3 April 2009

Copyright © 2009 Takeru Oyama et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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