Scholarly Research Exchange

Scholarly Research Exchange / 2009 / Article

Clinical Study | Open Access

Volume 2009 |Article ID 641360 | 4 pages | https://doi.org/10.3814/2009/641360

IgA Anticardiolipin in Patients with Gastroenteric Tumor

Received22 Jul 2008
Revised18 Nov 2008
Accepted08 Jan 2009
Published16 Feb 2009

Abstract

Recently the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies in patients with cancer has been demonstrated, suggesting an involvement of autoimmune response in neoplastic conditions. The presence of antiphospholipid antibodies in tumor disease is highly correlated with the risk of developing thrombotic complications, which represents a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in cancer patients. Interestingly, it has been highlighted that high levels of IgM and IgG anticardiolipin antibodies are more often produced in patients with gastroenteric tumor than in patients with either ovarian or breast tumor. Thus far, there are no data looking into the role or measurements of IgA in patients with solid cancer. Our preliminary results, in this study, demonstrate that testing only for IgG and IgM anticardiolipin antibodies may increase the incidence of false positive because 44% who were IgA positive and IgG and IgM negative had high titres of CA19.9 and CEA. We suggest that taking into account the role of IgA could substantially improve the detection of antiphospholipids antibodies in subjects with solid cancer, and this detection may allow us for better prevention and management of thrombotic complications in these patients.

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Copyright © 2009 Ilaria Bernardini et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


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