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Tuberculosis Research and Treatment
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 1702578, 6 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1702578
Review Article

The Bidirectional Relationship between Tuberculosis and Diabetes

1Endocrine & Diabetes Unit, Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, School of Medicine and Dentistry, College of Health Sciences, University of Ghana, Legon, Accra, Ghana
2Directorate of Medicine, Endocrine and Diabetes Unit, Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana
3Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, School of Medicine and Dentistry, College of Health Sciences, University of Ghana, Legon, Accra, Ghana

Correspondence should be addressed to Ernest Yorke; moc.oohay@muivolvap

Received 11 August 2017; Revised 25 September 2017; Accepted 17 October 2017; Published 12 November 2017

Academic Editor: Tom Ottenhoff

Copyright © 2017 Ernest Yorke et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The burden of tuberculosis (TB) especially in developing countries continues to remain high despite efforts to improve preventive strategies. Known traditional risk factors for TB include poverty, malnutrition, overcrowding, and HIV/AIDS; however, diabetes, which causes immunosuppression, is increasingly being recognized as an independent risk factor for tuberculosis, and the two often coexist and impact each other. Diabetes may also lead to severe disease, reactivation of dormant tuberculosis foci, and poor treatment outcomes. Tuberculosis as a disease entity on the other hand and some commonly used antituberculous medications separately may cause impaired glucose tolerance. This review seeks to highlight the impact of comorbid TB and diabetes on each other. It is our hope that this review will increase the awareness of clinicians and managers of TB and diabetes programs on the effect of the interaction between these two disease entities and how to better screen and manage patients.